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Saturday, October 8, 2011

Sepia Saturday #95 Saturday: 8 October 2011

THIS IS ANOTHER  
        S E P I A    S A T U R D A Y   POST


        WELCOME.....

                 Alan's theme photo for  Sepia Saturday, is a photograph by Henriette Crone - from the Royal Library of Denmark Collection:  showing Danish women marching for social justice....


So from women in Parliament to women working in mines, or as mimes ...I will follow a theme of women .....
in a few of their gathering rolls......

Some of their rolls were performed by actors playing various characters from life,  in public arenas....for enjoyment for all.....


I found this unique photo in a shoe box stuffed behind old books in an antique shop. Two of the performers in this unknown place, of nameless actors, stood out to me.  Can you guess which two?  The center all in important young woman appearing like she runs with Robin Hood, and the one on the right,  sporting much attitude with her arms folded... What is their story?  Auditioning, or already in their rolls?




More Power to the Women of the world......


This United States poster from the National Archives ran in the Minneapolis tribune....sparking quite a bit of fire you might say...in so many ways.

A very productive grouping of women were the various Ladies Groups, the Coffee Clubs of America United they Stand (or sit) Together....


Greeting from a coffee party in south Minneapolis, about 1935...they gathered to make their lives a better place for family and community...together..... Published in the Minneapolis Tribune

In the 40's women found themselves in unfamiliar places then what their normal roles were...

Women gathered at their last day of work for the Danube mine, Bovey, October 20, 1945....A normal day for them had been, "Taking care of children, a couple hours of sleep and get up and do their work."  Women pulled more and pushed more carts then many people today realize....... Photo courtesy of Minnesota Historical Society
and really they look Happy!

...and yet, while these women labored right along side of men, they were subjected to much belittlement, not just by snide remarks caught briefly around the lunch room...but in publications such as this below....


Sister?  He's not my brother.  A man-sized job, what is that?  ...and as for meeting the test, honey many of us are designing the tests!
If you want to check out more Sepia Saturday Posts, or care to share your own photos go here

http://sepiasaturday.blogspot.com/2011/10/sepia-saturday-95-saturday-8-october.html

17 comments:

Filip Demuinck said...

Very special these old photo's.

Greetings,
Filip

JJ said...

The women in #1 are definitely in their roles. Great photo.

darlin said...

Amen, we are designing the tests! Awesome photos Karen, if you don't mind I may borrow a few if need be for a project in Woman's studies, there's some fantastic points to open dialogue!

Karen S. said...

Darlin, you can have what ever photos you want...ever, I wouldn't post any that I wouldn't let someone use )I'd keep them hidden for safe keeping!)....if it helps be my guest! Do have some fun time too this weekend...recharging the mind and spirit!

Karen S. said...

Filip, thanks so much, and I'm happy you stopped by!

Karen S. said...

JJ I know, aren't they?! It only cost me one dollar but it's far more valuable to me!

Bob Scotney said...

Great photos, Karen - especially the first and fourth. I never did go much for posters though. The woman on the right has attitude that's sure, acting or not.

Sheila @ A Postcard a Day said...

I wonder what the actors play were in? The friend of robin Hood seems to be holding a harp of some sort. I love the picture of the women working in the 1940s. The sad thing was they mostly lost their positions as soon as the men came back from war.

Liz Stratton said...

Karen, Great take on the theme. I can't imagine what it must have been like for these women. Clearly they enjoyed their 'man' work during WWII. Sad that so many were forced out of their jobs at the end of the war. And, sadder yet that the attitude portrayed in the final poster prevailed for many, many decades.

Cloudia said...

Good to remember and not lose what they worked for!


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Tami said...

How funny! I have a variation of the "home canning" poster on my blog, but I didn't even know about the original. Thanks for updating me!

Peggy@Faithful Friend Cafe said...

I love the old photos Karen and trip to nostalgia! Thanks for stopping by my 6WS!

Oregon Gifts of Comfort and Joy said...

Karen, these are wonderful! I happen to love that canning one enough to want a copy for my fridge. I knew that women worked building airplanes, my husband's grandmother was one of them ... but I had no idea about them working in coal mines. Yes, that poster is a bit condescending, isn't it?

Great job!

Kathy M.

PattyF said...

Great post, Karen! You certainly developed your theme well! The "Good Work Sister" pic made me laugh (or maybe it was your spot-on commentary!) From the expression on her face, the woman in the drawing is thinking the same thing we are about the coughcoughgentleman'scoughcough comment. Love it!

Alan Burnett said...

The theme this week has brought forth a wonderful crop of posts that take the thread of the theme and weave them into a wonderful fabric. Your post is a perfect example.

Postcardy said...

That "Good Work, Sister" comment seems very degrading now, but someone probably though it was complementary back then.

Rob From Amersfoort said...

I love the last photo, the women seem to be proud of their job!