Contemplating.

Contemplating.
Wayzata, Minnesota

Saturday, November 2, 2013

Sepia Saturday - 201 - 2 November 2013

November really?  Doesn't it feel like this is all a dream, and we should still be wandering about the month, of let's say, July or possibly better yet, April?  An April with genuine spring like weather.  Oh well, it is what it is, right?



Anyway, please enjoy my presentation of "house" for this week's theme at Sepia Saturday.
 
 
There are dream houses, and mansions, houses from Victorian styles to Farmhouses galore out and about, and many of them will be presented right here.  Except, for the one single house I've posted here. 

I can't imagine anyone else posting this.
 
Architecture in houses is as diverse and varied as the county, or architect that builds it and often, the best or more unique designs are created by unknown architects.



SEPIA SATURDAY

First off, since I was born and raised in Michigan, I wanted to concentrate on a house from there.




Just think, this quaint, little place began as, a cabin in the woods.  Pickle Barrel House, located in Grand Marais, Michigan on the Upper Peninsula, on the southern shore of Lake Superior.  For all the delicious details go here.




 
 
At one time, this endearing, little barrel house was located in the woods outside Grand Marais.  It was built by Reid, Murcock and Company in 1926 for William Donahey and his wife, Mary.  Donahey, was the creator of The Teenie Weenies comic strip which was popular in the early part of the 20th century.  Another link is here.
 
 

The two-story barrel house was a replica of a pickle barrel, more on the story here.

 
 
Are you wondering what it appears like in the inside?
 
 
 
A peek inside.
 
 
 
If you found this house interesting you may enjoy checking out this next design to round out your taste for the unusual.
 
 
 
 

Presented by Bjorka, this inviting design is The Errante's Guest House, from Chile. 
 
 
To view other unusual oddities for houses check out this link at
 
 

23 comments:

TexWisGirl said...

the pickle barrel made my house look normal. :)

darlin said...

Tex you made me laugh! I LOVE your house!

Karen this is definitely a unique design, it's cute but for some strange reason I can't see myself living in this barrel. lol

Have a wonderful weekend!

Jackie Mc Guinness said...

We have a restaurant called The Pickle Barrel.

R. Mac Wheeler said...

cool

Deb Gould said...

Barrel houses? Yikes, that's amazing to me...makes me think of a fable, or fairy tale; a little creature living in a house made from a barrel. Very good twist on the house theme, indeed!

Helen Bauch McHargue said...

Aren't these people brave who invest their money in something so utterly personal. I'm sure they're hard to sell, even though they're interesting. Great take on the theme.

Nancy said...

I love the little barrel house. It looks so quaint and cozy!

Mike Brubaker said...

And just how many pickles could this house hold? And were they sweet or dill?

Karen S. said...

Mike, good questions, I'm not really sure! Ha! Ha!

Karen S. said...

Mike, good questions, I'm not really sure! Ha! Ha!

Boobook said...

Now that's the sort of house that Edsel Ford's daughter should have had as a cubby instead of the one that was built for her. (See Bob Scotney's blog.)

Sheila @ A Postcard a Day said...

It must be great fun to live in a house like that but so difficult to fit in any normal furniture.

Rosie said...

Wow, a pickle barrel house, what next? It would certainly be an interesting "summer" home. In other posts, I see that it was a common thing to move the whole house, not too much problem here to move this one I would presume.....

Wendy said...

Round houses were popular at the beach near here in the 1970s. A pickle-barrel house might make a fun little getaway in the woods but I wouldn't want one full time. The house reminds me of roadside diners built in some unique shape - a boot, a hot dog.

Postcardy said...

My mother liked to read the Teenie Weenies from the Sunday paper to me when I was little. For some reason, I thought they were creepy and scary and didn't really like them.

ScotSue said...

What a fascinating "house". Just saying out aloud the name "Pickle Barrel" makes me smile.

Hazel Ceej said...

The barrel house is really interesting. I have never seen one before even in photos. Glad to find something new (to me) today.

Hazel

Bob Scotney said...

This calls for a new nursery rhyme - The Old Woman Who Lived in a Barrel. Great fun.

Joan said...

That was like being taken inside a fairy tale and finding a magical house in the woods--- and then being taken inside for a peek. Very nice.

Kat Mortensen said...

We've got a few odd homes in Ontario too. There's one that's built mostly underground, for starters.

I'd love to see the family who lived in the "Pickle-barrel House".

Little Nell said...

Pickle barrels as aconcept are new to me - but as houses they’re positvely bizarre! I always think it must be hard fitting furniture into a room with no corners.

Gail Perlee said...

Our Homeowners Association would never have allowed a house such as the Pickle Barrel House to be built in our subdivision, but somewhere else, it's cute & certainly creative. Seeing how other people 'see' things is interesting and pique's the imagination!

Tattered and Lost said...

I love buildings like this that look like anything but a building. There's a great book that can be found online, used very cheap, called "California Crazy and Beyond" which shows the wonderful old roadside structures that were used to get people to stop long before the interstates came blasting through.